Credible Sources for Primary Sources

RESEARCH GUIDE

URL:

http://guides.library.harvard.edu/schlesinger/suffrage

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Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

Description:

Thorough and detailed research guide provided by Harvard’s Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, with dozens of links to more useful information.

Author(s):

  • None.

Title:

  • Women’s Suffrage

Publisher:

  • Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in the America

Date:

  • No date.

Citations:

Need the full citations? Request them in the Study Hall and we will respond with them as quickly as possible. You can also request more research, or get help with other parts of your paper.

PRIMARY SOURCES

URL:

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/womens-suffrage/

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What You’ll Find:

Description:

Collection of primary sources from the Women’s Suffrage movement provided by the Library of Congress, including original texts, photos, and an audio file.

Author(s):

  • None.

Title:

  • Women’s Suffrage

Publisher:

  • Library of Congress

Date:

  • No date.

Citations:

Need the full citations? Request them in the Study Hall and we will respond with them as quickly as possible. You can also request more research, or get help with other parts of your paper.

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://ecssba.rutgers.edu/docs/sbatrial.html

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“As a matter of outward form the defendant was asked if she had anything to say why the sentence of the court should not be pronounced upon her. “Yes, your honor,” replied Miss Anthony, “I have many things to say. My every right, constitutional, civil, political and judicial has been tramped upon. I have not only had no jury of my peers, but I have had no jury at all.” Court—”Sit down Miss Anthony. I cannot allow you to argue the question.” Miss Anthony—”I shall not sit down. I will not lose my only chance to speak.” Court—”You have been tried, Miss Anthony, by the forms of law, and my decision has been rendered by law.” Miss Anthony—”Yes, but laws made by men, under a government of men, interpreted by men and for the benefit of men. The only chance women have for justice in this country is to violate the law, as I have done, and as I shall continue to do,” and she struck her hand heavily on the table in emphasis of what she said. “Does your honor suppose that we obeyed the infamous fugitive slave law which forbade to give a cup of cold water to a slave fleeing from his master? I tell you we did not obey it; we fed him and clothed him, and sent him on his way to Canada. So shall we trample all unjust laws under foot. I do not ask the clemency of the court. I came into it to get justice, having failed in this, I demand the full rigors of the law.” Court—”The sentence of the court is $100 fine and the costs of the prosecution.” Miss Anthony—”I have no money to pay with, but am $10,000 in debt.” Court—”You are not ordered to stand committed till it is paid.””

Description:

3 accounts of remarks given by Susan B. Anthony at her Illegal Voting trial, regarded as “one of the best-known texts in the history of woman suffrage.”

Author(s):

  • Ann D. Gordon (Editor)

Title:

  • Remarks by Susan B. Anthony in the Circuit Court of the United States for the Northern District of New York

Publisher:

  • Rutgers University

Date:

  • 2000

Citations:

Need the full citations? Request them in the Study Hall and we will respond with them as quickly as possible. You can also request more research, or get help with other parts of your paper.

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“The Bill of Rights: A Transcription

The Preamble to The Bill of Rights

Congress of the United States begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.”

MLA Citation:

“Bill of Rights”. Archives.gov. National Archives and Records Administration, 2013. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). < http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html>.

In-Text: (“Bill of Rights”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Bill of Rights. (2013).Retrieved (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE), from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html

In-Text: (Bill of Rights)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Maslow/motivation.htm

Sorry to bother you but you should probably sell your old books…

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“The ‘physiological’ needs. — The needs that are usually taken as the starting point for motivation theory are the so-called physiological drives. Two recent lines of research make it necessary to revise our customary notions about these needs, first, the development of the concept of homeostasis, and second, the finding that appetites (preferential choices among foods) are a fairly efficient indication of actual needs or lacks in the body.”

MLA Citation:

Maslow, A.H. (Internet resource created by Christopher D. Green, York University). psychclassics.yorku.ca. York University, Aug. 2000.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Maslow/motivation.htm>.

In-Text: (Maslow)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Maslow, A. (Aug, 2000). A Theory of Human Motivation. Retrieved from http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Maslow/motivation.htm

In-Text: (Maslow, 2000)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

Further Reading

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and a Happiness Study – The Altantic

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Deficiency Needs and Growth Needs – Valdosta State University

Hierarchy of Needs, Effect of Growth Needs When Deficiency Needs are Met – Psychology Today

Read More Comments Off on A Theory of Human Motivation, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Primary Source

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-power-of-non-violence/

Samples:

“From the very beginning there was a philosophy undergirding the Montgomery boycott, the philosophy of nonviolent resistance. There was always the problem of getting this method over because it didn’t make sense to most of the people in the beginning. We had to use our mass meetings to explain nonviolence to a community of people who had never heard of the philosophy and in many instances were not sympathetic with it. We had meetings twice a week on Mondays and on Thursdays, and we had an institute on nonviolence and social change. We had to make it clear that nonviolent resistance is not a method of cowardice. It does resist. It is not a method of stagnant passivity and deadening complacency. The nonviolent resister is just as opposed to the evil that he is standing against as the violent resister but he resists without violence. This method is nonaggressive physically but strongly aggressive spiritually.”

“Another basic thing we had to get over is that nonviolent resistance is also an internal matter. It not only avoids external violence or external physical violence but also internal violence of spirit. And so at the center of our movement stood the philosophy of love. The attitude that the only way to ultimately change humanity and make for the society that we all long for is to keep love at the center of our lives. Now people used to ask me from the beginning what do you mean by love and how is it that you can tell us to love those persons who seek to defeat us and those persons who stand against us; how can you love such persons? And I had to make it clear all along that love in its highest sense is not a sentimental sort of thing, not even an affectionate sort of thing.”

“Modern psychology has a word that is probably used more than any other word. It is the word “maladjusted.” Now we all should seek to live a well—adjusted life in order to avoid neurotic and schizophrenic personalities. But there are some things within our social order to which I am proud to be maladjusted and to which I call upon you to be maladjusted. I never intend to adjust myself to segregation and discrimination. I never intend to adjust myself to mob rule. I never intend to adjust myself to the tragic effects of the methods of physical violence and to tragic militarism. I call upon you to be maladjusted to such things. I call upon you to be as maladjusted to such things. I call upon you to be as maladjusted as Amos who in the midst of the injustices of his day cried out in words that echo across the generation, “Let judgment run down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.” As maladjusted as Abraham Lincoln who had the vision to see that this nation could not exist half slave and half free. As maladjusted as Jefferson, who in the midst of an age amazingly adjusted to slavery could cry out, “All men are created equal and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights and that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” As maladjusted as Jesus of Nazareth who dreamed a dream of the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. God grant that we will be so maladjusted that we will be able to go out and change our world and our civilization. And then we will be able to move from the bleak and desolate midnight of man’s inhumanity to man to the bright and glittering daybreak of freedom and justice.”

MLA Citation:

“The Power of Non-Violence”. teachingamericanhistory.org. Ashbrook Center at Ashland University, n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-power-of-non-violence/>.

In-Text: (“The Power of Non-violence”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

The Power of Non-violence. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-power-of-non-violence/

In-Text: (The Power of Non-violence, n.d.)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

Read More Comments Off on Martin Luther King Primary Source, The Power of Non-violence