Credible Sources for American Revolution

Primary Sources

Below is a list of great websites for finding historical primary sources, ranging from the Constitution to the Civil War and even WWII.  You will be able to find transcripts, text documents, photos, and other important pieces of history to use in your research papers and assignments. Don’t forget to bookmark this page for easy access!

 

Archives.gov

This resource allows you to browse all primary sources available from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, with topics including America’s founding documents, science and technology, and military records. This is one of the most comprehensive places to find primary sources on for America’s history on the web. Here are some examples of what you will find there:

 

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

This resource provides an enormous collection of American historical documents ranging from letters, diaries, maps, newspapers, and photos.  The sources found here range from the very beginning of American history, the landing of columbus, to Barack Obama’s first inaugural address. Some examples of what you’ll find include:

 

OurDocuments.gov

This resource provides a long list of primary sources that chronicles American history from 1776 to 1965. The documents listed here include:

 

CivilWar.org

This website is dedicated to information about the American Civil War and provides a thorough list of any primary sources available from that period, including speeches, military correspondence, and photos. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Famous-Trials.com

Famous-trials.com is a website operated by professor Douglas O. Linder from the UMKC School of Law. The site provides primary documents and information on many very well-known trials throughout history, going all the way back to the Trial of Socrates, and also most recently covering the George Zimmerman case involving Trayvon Martin. Here are some examples of what you can find here:

 

TeachingAmericanHistory.org

Despite the name of the website, this resource is not just for teachers as it does provide access to many primary sources from American history. The page linked to here lists 50 “core documents that tell America’s story” and include the Declaration of Independence and 1944 State of the Union address. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is a major record-keeping entity of the U.S. government and contains many documents of all kinds that are important to American history and culture. The link listed above takes you to a page where you can search, or select from the links on the right side of the page to browse be era. Here are those links, for your convenience:

 

Further Resources

The combination of resources above should do well in meeting any students needs for primary sources on topics relating to American history, but there are still many other resources available to access these kinds of documents. Here is a gigantic list of other websites that can provide a wide variety of primary sources:

 

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/VP_John_Adams.htm

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Sample:

“On April 21, 1789, John Adams, the first vice president of the United States, began his duties as president of the Senate. Adams’ role in the administration of George Washington was sharply constrained by the constitutional limits on the vice-presidency and his own reluctance to encroach upon executive prerogative. He enjoyed a cordial but distant relationship with President Washington, who sought his advice on occasion but relied primarily on the cabinet. Adams played a more active role in the Senate, however, particularly during his first term.

As president of the Senate, Adams cast twenty-nine tie-breaking votes—a record that no successor has ever threatened. His votes protected the president’s sole authority over the removal of appointees, influenced the location of the national capital, and prevented war with Great Britain. On at least one occasion he persuaded senators to vote against legislation that he opposed, and he frequently lectured the Senate on procedural and policy matters. Adams’ political views and his active role in the Senate made him a natural target for critics of the Washington administration. Toward the end of his first term, he began to exercise more restraint in the hope of realizing the goal shared by many of his successors: election in his own right as president of the United States.”

Description:

Author(s):

  • None.

Title:

  • John Adams, 1st Vice President (1789-1797)

Publisher:

  • United State Senate, Senate Historical Office

Date:

  • No date.

Citations:

Need the full citations? Request them in the Study Hall and we will respond with them as quickly as possible. You can also request more research, or get help with other parts of your paper.

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter

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Sample:

“But one man both literally and figuratively stands above the fray in each of these productions: George Washington. No one seems to have the ability or desire to crack the code on the tall Virginian. Whatever the scenario, the other men squabble and fight, but Washington stands to the side: quiet, dignified, a bit aloof, and probably dressed in his military uniform. In Hamilton, Miranda acknowledges this lack of color when he has General Washington break the fourth wall to beg the audience’s pardon so that he can “let down my guard and tell the people how I feel a second.” He briefly shares his concern that the soldiers he commands want to “put him on a pedestal,” and then he quickly returns to that very stand for nearly the balance of the show. For the most part, however, Washington stands much like a statue as the other Founders swirl about him in a frenzy of activity.”

MLA Citation:

Adelman, Joseph M. “George Washington, Man of Mystery.” theatlantic.com. The Atlantic Monthly Group, 15 Feb. 2016.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter>.

In-Text: (Adelman)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Adelman, J.M. (2016, Feb. 15). The Atlantic Monthly Group. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter

In-Text: (Adelman, 2016)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jefffed.html

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Sample:

“Jefferson played a major role in the planning, design, and construction of a national capitol and the federal district. In the various public offices he held, Jefferson sought to establish a federal government of limited powers. In the 1800 presidential election, Jefferson and Aaron Burr deadlocked, creating a constitutional crisis. However, once Jefferson received sufficient votes in the electoral college, he and the defeated incumbent, John Adams, established the principle that power would be passed peacefully from losers to victors in presidential elections. Jefferson called his election triumph “the second American Revolution.””

MLA Citation:

“Thomas Jefferson – Establishing a Federal Republic”. loc.gov. n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jefffed.html>.

In-Text: (“Thomas Jefferson – Establishing a Federal Government”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Thomas Jefferson – Establishing a Federal Government. n.d. Retrieved from http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jefffed.html

In-Text: (Thomas Jefferson – Establishing a Federal Government)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html

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Sample:

“The Bill of Rights: A Transcription

The Preamble to The Bill of Rights

Congress of the United States begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.”

MLA Citation:

“Bill of Rights”. Archives.gov. National Archives and Records Administration, 2013. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). < http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html>.

In-Text: (“Bill of Rights”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Bill of Rights. (2013).Retrieved (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE), from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html

In-Text: (Bill of Rights)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

Read More Comments Off on Second Amendment, Bill of Rights – Archives.gov

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/story-surrounding-jefferson-and-declaration

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Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“The first formal proposal for independence was not made in the Continental Congress until June 7, 1776.  It came from the Virginian Richard Henry Lee, who suggested that “all political connection is, and ought to be, dissolved.”[2]    But this was not a unanimous sentiment.  Many delegates wanted to defer independence or avoid it outright.  Still, Congress did nominate a drafting committee—the Committee of Five—to compose a declaration of independence.  Thomas Jefferson, known for his eloquent writing style and reserved manner, became the principal author.”

MLA Citation:

“The Story Surrounding Jefferson and the Declaration”. monticello.org. Monitcello and the University of Virginia, 2013.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/story-surrounding-jefferson-and-declaration>.

In-Text: (“The Story Surrounding Jefferson and the Declaration”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

The Story Surrounding Jefferson and the Declaration. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/story-surrounding-jefferson-and-declaration

In-Text: (The Story Surrounding Jefferson and the Declaration)

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Read More Comments Off on The Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson – Summary

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/brief-biography-thomas-jefferson

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Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“Thomas Jefferson — author of the Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, third president of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia — voiced the aspirations of a new America as no other individual of his era. As public official, historian, philosopher, and plantation owner, he served his country for over five decades.”

MLA Citation:

“Thomas Jefferson, A Brief Biography”. monticello.org. Monticello and the University of Virginia, 2013.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/brief-biography-thomas-jefferson>.

In-Text: (“Thomas Jefferson, A Brief Biography”

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Thomas Jefferson, A Brief Biography. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/brief-biography-thomas-jefferson

In-Text: (Thomas Jefferson, A Brief Biography)

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Read More Comments Off on Thomas Jefferson General Biography

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/am_rev_timeline.htm

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Sample:

June 17, 1775 – The first major fight between British and American troops occurs at Boston in the Battle of Bunker Hill. American troops are dug in along the high ground of Breed’s Hill (the actual location) and are attacked by a frontal assault of over 2000 British soldiers who storm up the hill. The Americans are ordered not to fire until they can see “the whites of their eyes.” As the British get within 15 paces, the Americans let loose a deadly volley of rifle fire and halt the British advance. The British then regroup and attack 30 minutes later with the same result. A third attack, however, succeeds as the Americans run out of ammunition and are left only with bayonets and stones to defend themselves. The British succeed in taking the hill, but at a loss of half their force, over a thousand casualties, with the Americans losing about 400, including important colonial leader, General Joseph Warren.

MLA Citation:

Taylor, Quintard. “United States History: Timeline: War of Independence”. faculty.washington.edu. University of Washington, n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/am_rev_timeline.htm>.

In-Text: (Taylor)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Taylor, Quintard. (n.d.). United States History: Timeline: War of Independence. Retrieved from http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/am_rev_timeline.htm

In-Text: (Taylor)

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Read More Comments Off on Revolutionary War Timeline, US History

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html

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Sample:

“Through his 15 years in the House of Burgesses his opinions were solidifying into fixed standards and settled convictions that were to hold him fast and keep him true to the defense of the principles of representative government for the Colonies. He had felt the spell of Patrick Henry’s ringing challenges to the spirit of free-born Englishmen: “If this be treason make the most of it — Give me liberty or give me death.””

MLA Citation:

“George Washington: The Commander in Chief”. ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, 1966.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html>.

In-Text: (George Washington: The Commander in Chief)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Retrieved from http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html

In-Text:

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Read More Comments Off on George Washington, History, Life and Career

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/06/opinion/06gates.1.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Samples:

“In 1790, only 1.7 percent of Virginia’s population consisted of free people of color; in the 13 former colonies and the territories of Kentucky, Maine and Vermont, the combined figure was even smaller. Historians estimate that only 5,000 black men served in the Continental Army, whereas tens of thousands fled slavery to join the British.”

“The story of John Redman is illuminating because it opens a window on an aspect of the Revolutionary War that remains too little known: the contributions and sacrifices of a band of black patriots. But it is particularly fascinating to me because, as I learned just recently, John Redman was my ancestor.”

“Like most African-Americans of my generation, I had heard of the Daughters of the American Revolution, unfortunately, because of their refusal in 1939 to allow the great contralto, Marian Anderson, the right to perform at Constitution Hall. Anderson responded to the group’s racism with sonorous defiance, holding her Easter Sunday concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial instead.”

MLA Citation:

Gates, Henry Louis. nytimes.com. The New York Times Company, 6 Aug. 2006.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/06/opinion/06gates.1.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0>.

In-Text: (Gates)

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APA Citation:

Gates, H. (6 Aug, 2006). Native Sons of Liberty. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/06/opinion/06gates.1.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

In-Text: (Gates, 2006)

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Read More Comments Off on Revolutionary War/Black History/African-American Patriots

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.ushistory.org/us/10b.asp

Samples:

“Another important function of the Sons of Liberty was correspondence. These clubs could be found up and down the colonial seaboard. Often they coordinated their activities. Like the public Congresses that would be convened, this private band of societies provided an intercolonial network that would help forge unity. It should come as no surprise that the members of the Sons of Liberty and the delegates to the various Congresses were at times one and the same.”

“The Daughters of Liberty performed equally important functions. Once nonimportation became the decided course of action, there was a natural textile shortage. Mass spinning bees were organized in various colonial cities to make homespun substitutes. Since women often purchased consumer goods for the home, the Daughters of Liberty became instrumental in upholding the boycott, particularly where tea was concerned. The most zealous Daughters of Liberty refused to accept gentleman callers for themselves or their daughters who were not sympathetic to the patriot cause.”

MLA Citation:

“Sons and Daughters of Liberty”. ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia, 2013.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.ushistory.org/us/10b.asp>.

In-Text: (“Sons and Daughters of Liberty”)

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APA Citation:

The Sons and Daughters of Liberty. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.ushistory.org/us/10b.asp

In-Text: (The Sons and Daughters of Liberty, 2013)

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Read More Comments Off on The Sons and Daughters of Liberty, E Pluribus Unum, American Revolution