Credible Sources for 20th Century

Primary Sources

Below is a list of great websites for finding historical primary sources, ranging from the Constitution to the Civil War and even WWII.  You will be able to find transcripts, text documents, photos, and other important pieces of history to use in your research papers and assignments. Don’t forget to bookmark this page for easy access!

 

Archives.gov

This resource allows you to browse all primary sources available from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, with topics including America’s founding documents, science and technology, and military records. This is one of the most comprehensive places to find primary sources on for America’s history on the web. Here are some examples of what you will find there:

 

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

This resource provides an enormous collection of American historical documents ranging from letters, diaries, maps, newspapers, and photos.  The sources found here range from the very beginning of American history, the landing of columbus, to Barack Obama’s first inaugural address. Some examples of what you’ll find include:

 

OurDocuments.gov

This resource provides a long list of primary sources that chronicles American history from 1776 to 1965. The documents listed here include:

 

CivilWar.org

This website is dedicated to information about the American Civil War and provides a thorough list of any primary sources available from that period, including speeches, military correspondence, and photos. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Famous-Trials.com

Famous-trials.com is a website operated by professor Douglas O. Linder from the UMKC School of Law. The site provides primary documents and information on many very well-known trials throughout history, going all the way back to the Trial of Socrates, and also most recently covering the George Zimmerman case involving Trayvon Martin. Here are some examples of what you can find here:

 

TeachingAmericanHistory.org

Despite the name of the website, this resource is not just for teachers as it does provide access to many primary sources from American history. The page linked to here lists 50 “core documents that tell America’s story” and include the Declaration of Independence and 1944 State of the Union address. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is a major record-keeping entity of the U.S. government and contains many documents of all kinds that are important to American history and culture. The link listed above takes you to a page where you can search, or select from the links on the right side of the page to browse be era. Here are those links, for your convenience:

 

Further Resources

The combination of resources above should do well in meeting any students needs for primary sources on topics relating to American history, but there are still many other resources available to access these kinds of documents. Here is a gigantic list of other websites that can provide a wide variety of primary sources:

 

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/zgy334j

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“Ignoring Russian warnings, Austria-Hungary issued the Serbian government with its ultimatum.

It blamed Serbian officials for Franz Ferdinand’s assassination and made a series of demands. Among them: Serbia must stop all anti-Austro-Hungarian propaganda and remove anyone deemed guilty of it from office; it must accept Austria-Hungary’s collaboration in suppressing subversive movements within Serbia, and it must allow Austria to direct judicial proceedings against accessories in the assassination plot. In short, Serbia was being asked to hand over sovereignty.”

MLA Citation:

Macmillan, Margaret. “37 days: Countdown to World War One.” BBC, n.d., http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/zgy334j. Accessed (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE).

In-Text: (Macmillan)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Macmillan, M. (n.d.). 37 days: Countdown to World War One. BBC. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/zgy334j

In-Text: (Macmillan)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005143

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“To concentrate and monitor the Jewish population as well as to facilitate later deportation of the Jews, the Germans and their collaborators created ghettos, transit camps, and forced-labor camps for Jews during the war years. The German authorities also established numerous forced-labor camps, both in the so-called Greater German Reich and in German-occupied territory, for non-Jews whose labor the Germans sought to exploit.

Following the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, Einsatzgruppen (mobile killing units) and, later, militarized battalions of Order Police officials, moved behind German lines to carry out mass-murder operations against Jews, Roma, and Soviet state and Communist Party officials. German SS and police units, supported by units of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen SS, murdered more than a million Jewish men, women, and children, and hundreds of thousands of others.”

MLA Citation:

“Introduction to the Holocaust.” ushmm.org. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 29 Jan. 2016.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005143>.

In-Text: (“Introduction to the Holocaust”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Introduction to the Holocaust. (2016, Jan. 29). United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved from http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005143

In-Text: (“Introduction to the Holocaust”, 2016)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-mutual-assured-destruction.htm

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“This fact was officially accepted in a military doctrine known as Mutual Assured Destruction, a.k.a. MAD. Mutual Assured Destruction began to emerge at the end of the Kennedy administration. MAD reflects the idea that one’s population could best be protected by leaving it vulnerable so long as the other side faced comparable vulnerabilities. In short: Whoever shoots first, dies second.”

MLA Citation:

“Mutually Assured Destruction.” nuclearfiles.org. Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-mutual-assured-destruction.htm>.

In-Text: (“Mutually Assured Destruction”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Mutually Assured Destruction. (n.d.). Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-mutual-assured-destruction.htm

In-Text: (Mutually Assured Destruction)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-17026538

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“In essence it meant stockpiling a huge nuclear arsenal. In the event of a Soviet attack the US would have enough nuclear firepower to survive a first wave of nuclear strikes and strike back. The response would be so massive that the enemy would suffer “assured destruction”.”

MLA Citation:

De Castella, Tom. “How did we forget about mutually assured destruction?” bbc.com. BBC, 15 Feb. 2012.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-17026538>.

In-Text: (De Castella)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

De Castella, T. (2012, Feb. 15). How did we forget about mutually assured destruction? BBC. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-17026538

In-Text: (De Castella, 2012)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/learn/education/for-students/research-starters/d-day.html

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“The Allied invasion of Western Europe was code named Operation Overlord. It required two years of planning, training, and supplying by the United States and Great Britain, and was one of the most heavily guarded secrets of the war. On the morning of June 5, 1944, U.S. General Dwight Eisenhower announced “O.K. We’ll go.” Within hours an armada of 3,000 landing craft, 2,500 ships, and 500 naval vessels departed English ports to cross the narrow strip of sea to German-controlled Normandy, France.”

MLA Citation:

“Research Starters: D-Day.” nationalww2museum.org. The National WWII Museum, n.d. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.nationalww2museum.org/learn/education/for-students/research-starters/d-day.html>.

In-Text: (“Research Starters: D-Day”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Research Starters: D-Day. (n.d.).  National WWII Museum.  Retrieved from http://www.nationalww2museum.org/learn/education/for-students/research-starters/d-day.html

In-Text: (Research Starters: D-Day)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/1900_2000_timeline.htm

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“1940 – (May) Germany invades Holland, Belgium and France – Churchill becomes P.M.

– (May 30) British evacuate Continent at Dunkirk

– (June) France Surrenders

1941 – (June) Germany invades Russia

– (DECEMBER) JAPANESE ATTACK PEARL HARBOR – U.S. DECLARES WAR ON JAPAN

– HITLER DECLARES WAR ON U.S.”

MLA Citation:

Taylor, Quintard. “United States History: Timeline: 1900 – 2000”. faculty.washington.edu. University of Washington, n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/1900_2000_timeline.htm>.

In-Text: (Taylor)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Taylor, Q. (n.d.). United States History: Timeline: 1900 – 2000. Retrieved from http://faculty.washington.edu/qtaylor/a_us_history/1900_2000_timeline.htm

In-Text: (Taylor)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

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