Credible Sources for Economics

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

https://www.fastcoexist.com/3068125/solar-now-provides-twice-as-many-jobs-as-the-coal-industry

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Sample:

“As solar power keeps getting cheaper—and more and more of it is built as a result—the industry is also an increasingly important source of new jobs, adding workers at a rate nearly 17 times faster than the overall economy. Twice as many people now work in solar than in the coal industry, according to a new survey from the nonprofit Solar Foundation.

While 40 coal plants were retired in the U.S. in 2016, and no new coal plants were built, the solar industry broke records for new installations, with 14,000 megawatts of new installed power. Many of the jobs came from constructing massive solar plants like the Springbok Solar Farm, which is being built on a site that sprawls over 12 miles in the Mojave Desert.

“It’s very labor-intensive,” Andrea Luecke, president and executive director of the Solar Foundation, tells Co.Exist. “It takes hundreds of people to work on some of these large-scale systems, and it takes about 18 months for the systems to go from start to finish.” In some cases, a traveling crew moves from site to site. Other companies focus on hiring local workers, and while large solar farms may be located only in the sunniest places, rooftop solar is creating more construction jobs everywhere.”

Description:

Data shows that solar employs twice as many people as the coal industry does as of 2016, with coal shutting down 40 plants and not adding any in 2016.

Author(s):

  • Adele Peters

Title:

  • Solar Now Provides Twice As Many Jobs As The Coal Industry

Publisher:

  • Fast Company

Date:

  • February 14, 2017

Citations:

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://monthlyreview.org/commentary/did-mao-really-kill-millions-in-the-great-leap-forward/

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Sample:

“Official Chinese sources, released after Mao’s death, suggest that 16.5 million people died in the Great Leap Forward. These figures were released during an ideological campaign by the government of Deng Xiaoping against the legacy of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. However, there seems to be no way of independently, authenticating these figures due to the great mystery about how they were gathered and preserved for twenty years before being released to the general public. American researchers managed to increase this figure to around 30 million by combining the Chinese evidence with extrapolations of their own from China’s censuses in 1953 and 1964. Recently, Jung Chang and Jon Halliday in their book Mao: the Unknown Story reported 70 million killed by Mao, including 38 million in the Great Leap Forward.”

MLA Citation:

Ball, Joseph. “Did Mao Really Kill Millions in the Great Leap Forward?” monthlyreview.org. Monthly Review, 21 Sep. 2006.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://monthlyreview.org/commentary/did-mao-really-kill-millions-in-the-great-leap-forward/>.

In-Text: (Ball)

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APA Citation:

Ball, J. (2006, Sep. 21). Did Mao really kill millions in the Great Leap Forward? Monthly Review. Retrieved from http://monthlyreview.org/commentary/did-mao-really-kill-millions-in-the-great-leap-forward/

In-Text: (Ball, 2006)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html

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Sample:

“Excessive alcohol consumption, or heavy drinking, is defined as consuming an average of more than one alcoholic beverage per day for women, and an average of more than two alcoholic beverages per day for men, and any drinking by pregnant women or underage youth.

Researchers found the costs largely resulted from losses in workplace productivity (72 percent of the total cost), health care expenses for problems caused by excessive drinking (11 percent of the total cost), law enforcement and other criminal justice expenses related to excessive alcohol consumption (9 percent of the total cost), and motor vehicle crash costs from impaired driving (6 percent of the total cost). The study did not consider a number of other costs such as those due to pain and suffering by the excessive drinker or others who were affected by the drinking, and thus may be an underestimate. Researchers estimated that excessive drinking cost $746 per person in the United States in 2006.”

MLA Citation:

“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006.” cdc.gov. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Oct. 2011.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html>.

In-Text: (“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006”)

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APA Citation:

CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006. (2011, Oct. 17). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html

In-Text: (“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006”, 2011)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2013/#section=country-profiles-unitedstates

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Sample:

“Key Demographic and Economic Indicators Total population (millions) ………………………………………………………………………………. 311.59 Population growth (%) ………………………………………………………………………………………. 0.72 Fertility rate (births per woman)………………………………………………………………………….. 1.99 Overall population sex ratio (male/female) ……………………………………………………………. 0.98 GDP (US$ billions)…………………………………………………………………………………….. 11,744.22 GDP (PPP) per capita (constant 2005, international $)…………………………………………. 42,486 Female adult unemployment rate (% of female labour force)……………………………………….. 9 Male adult unemployment rate (% of male labour force)……………………………………………… 9”

MLA Citation:

Bekhouche, Yasmina, and Laura D’Andrea Tyson, Ricardo Hausmann, Saadia Zahidi. “Global Gender Gap Report 2013.” reports.weforum.org. World Economic Forum, 2013.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2013/#section=country-profiles-unitedstates>.

In-Text: (Berkhouche et al.)

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APA Citation:

Berkhouche, Y., Tyson, L.D., Hausmann, R., Zahidi, S. (2013). World Economic Forum. Retrieved from http://reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2013/#section=country-profiles-unitedstates

In-Text: (Berkhouche, Tyson, Hausmann, Zahidi, 2013)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2015/12/28/jech-2015-206274.full

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Sample:

“Substantial evidence supports the notion that adult chronic diseases are not determined solely by exposures and events in adult life. Beyond genetic susceptibility, exposures and the social circumstances of early life begin a process that extends throughout the lifespan to influence adult disease. Epidemiologists take a life-course approach to the study of physical and social hazards during gestation, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood and midlife that can affect adult chronic disease risk and health outcomes. This well-established approach aims to identify the underlying biological, behavioural and psychosocial processes that operate across the lifespan. Aetiological factors may act during critical periods of development, with or without additional later life influences, or they may act through the accumulation of risk through various pathways. This approach focuses our attention on the importance of the early environment on human biological and psychological development and on the timing of a range of exposures during this critical period, including those associated with adverse socioeconomic circumstances.”

MLA Citation:

Vohra, Jyotsna,  Michael G Marmot, Linda Bauld, and Robert A Hiatt. “Socioeconomic position in childhood and cancer in adulthood: a rapid-review.” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (29 Dec. 2015): n.p.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2015/12/28/jech-2015-206274.full>.

In-Text: (Vohra et al.)

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APA Citation:

Vohra, J., Marmot, M. G., Bauld, L., & Hiatt, Robert A. (2015, Dec 29). Socioeconomic position in childhood and cancer in adulthood: a rapid-review. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, n.p. doi:10.1136/jech-2015-206274

In-Text: (Vohra, Marmot, Bauld, Hiatt, 2015)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

 

URL:

http://fee.org/freeman/athletes-salaries-too-high-sports-fans-blame-yourselves/

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Sample:

“I am presenting an account of their conversation here not because I suspect that the readers of The Freeman are especially interested in Rodriguez, but because it struck me as representative of a type of complaint commonly made about the workings of the market: To many people it just doesn’t seem right that pop stars/investment bankers/athletes get paid so much more than nurses/firemen/teachers.”

MLA Citation:

Callahan, Gene. “Athletes’ Salaries Too High? Sports Fans, Blame Yourselves.” fee.org. Foundation for Economics Education, 1 July. 2007.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://fee.org/freeman/athletes-salaries-too-high-sports-fans-blame-yourselves/>.

In-Text: (Callahan)

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APA Citation:

Callahan, G (2007, July 1). Athletes’ salaries too high? Sports fans, blame yourselves. Foundation for Economics Education. Retrieved from http://fee.org/freeman/athletes-salaries-too-high-sports-fans-blame-yourselves/

In-Text: (Callahan, 2007)

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