Credible Sources for George Washington

Primary Sources

Below is a list of great websites for finding historical primary sources, ranging from the Constitution to the Civil War and even WWII.  You will be able to find transcripts, text documents, photos, and other important pieces of history to use in your research papers and assignments. Don’t forget to bookmark this page for easy access!

 

Archives.gov

This resource allows you to browse all primary sources available from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, with topics including America’s founding documents, science and technology, and military records. This is one of the most comprehensive places to find primary sources on for America’s history on the web. Here are some examples of what you will find there:

 

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

This resource provides an enormous collection of American historical documents ranging from letters, diaries, maps, newspapers, and photos.  The sources found here range from the very beginning of American history, the landing of columbus, to Barack Obama’s first inaugural address. Some examples of what you’ll find include:

 

OurDocuments.gov

This resource provides a long list of primary sources that chronicles American history from 1776 to 1965. The documents listed here include:

 

CivilWar.org

This website is dedicated to information about the American Civil War and provides a thorough list of any primary sources available from that period, including speeches, military correspondence, and photos. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Famous-Trials.com

Famous-trials.com is a website operated by professor Douglas O. Linder from the UMKC School of Law. The site provides primary documents and information on many very well-known trials throughout history, going all the way back to the Trial of Socrates, and also most recently covering the George Zimmerman case involving Trayvon Martin. Here are some examples of what you can find here:

 

TeachingAmericanHistory.org

Despite the name of the website, this resource is not just for teachers as it does provide access to many primary sources from American history. The page linked to here lists 50 “core documents that tell America’s story” and include the Declaration of Independence and 1944 State of the Union address. Here is some of what you’ll find:

 

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is a major record-keeping entity of the U.S. government and contains many documents of all kinds that are important to American history and culture. The link listed above takes you to a page where you can search, or select from the links on the right side of the page to browse be era. Here are those links, for your convenience:

 

Further Resources

The combination of resources above should do well in meeting any students needs for primary sources on topics relating to American history, but there are still many other resources available to access these kinds of documents. Here is a gigantic list of other websites that can provide a wide variety of primary sources:

 

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“But one man both literally and figuratively stands above the fray in each of these productions: George Washington. No one seems to have the ability or desire to crack the code on the tall Virginian. Whatever the scenario, the other men squabble and fight, but Washington stands to the side: quiet, dignified, a bit aloof, and probably dressed in his military uniform. In Hamilton, Miranda acknowledges this lack of color when he has General Washington break the fourth wall to beg the audience’s pardon so that he can “let down my guard and tell the people how I feel a second.” He briefly shares his concern that the soldiers he commands want to “put him on a pedestal,” and then he quickly returns to that very stand for nearly the balance of the show. For the most part, however, Washington stands much like a statue as the other Founders swirl about him in a frenzy of activity.”

MLA Citation:

Adelman, Joseph M. “George Washington, Man of Mystery.” theatlantic.com. The Atlantic Monthly Group, 15 Feb. 2016.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter>.

In-Text: (Adelman)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Adelman, J.M. (2016, Feb. 15). The Atlantic Monthly Group. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/george-washington-man-of-mystery/462810/?utm_source=SFTwitter

In-Text: (Adelman, 2016)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“Through his 15 years in the House of Burgesses his opinions were solidifying into fixed standards and settled convictions that were to hold him fast and keep him true to the defense of the principles of representative government for the Colonies. He had felt the spell of Patrick Henry’s ringing challenges to the spirit of free-born Englishmen: “If this be treason make the most of it — Give me liberty or give me death.””

MLA Citation:

“George Washington: The Commander in Chief”. ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, 1966.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html>.

In-Text: (George Washington: The Commander in Chief)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

Retrieved from http://www.ushistory.org/Valleyforge/washington/george2.html

In-Text:

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewashington

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

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Sample:

“He pursued two intertwined interests: military arts and western expansion. At 16 he helped survey Shenandoah lands for Thomas, Lord Fairfax. Commissioned a lieutenant colonel in 1754, he fought the first skirmishes of what grew into the French and Indian War. The next year, as an aide to Gen. Edward Braddock, he escaped injury although four bullets ripped his coat and two horses were shot from under him.”

MLA Citation:

“George Washington”. whitehouse.gov. whitehouse.gov, n.d.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewashington>.

In-Text: (“George Washington”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

George Washington. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewashington

In-Text: (George Washington)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

Read More Comments Off on George Washington, Biography