Credible Sources for Romeo and Juliet

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/daughters-in-shakespeare-dreams-duty-and-defiance

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Sample:

“A number of Shakespeare’s plays show daughters negotiating the demands of their fathers, often trying to reconcile duty with a desire for independence. Kim Ballard considers five of Shakespeare’s most memorable literary daughters: Juliet, Desdemona, Portia, Katherina and Cordelia.

When we consider that Shakespeare lived in an age when all actors were male and the subject matter of serious drama focused heavily on the exploits of men, it’s hardly surprising that female characters are in a minority in his plays. And yet Shakespeare created many complex and engaging female roles for his young male actors to perform. Parent-child relationships feature heavily, and a significant number of these involve fathers and daughters. Interestingly, mothers are often absent from the drama, throwing the daughter/father relationship into sharp relief. A father of two daughters himself, Shakespeare’s dramatic daughters make a formidable line-up of young women, most of them at a transitional stage between the protection of their childhood home and an adult life beyond it. The transition is rarely a smooth one: in both comedies and tragedies, tension rises as daughters go in search of love, adventure and independence. “

MLA Citation:

Ballard, Kim. “Daughters in Shakespeare: dreams, duty and defiance.” British Library, n.d., https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/daughters-in-shakespeare-dreams-duty-and-defiance. Accessed (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE).

In-Text: (Ballard)

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APA Citation:

Ballard, K. (n.d.). Daughters in Shakespeare: dreams, duty and defiance. British Library. Retrieved from https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/daughters-in-shakespeare-dreams-duty-and-defiance

In-Text: (Ballard)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/juliets-eloquence

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Sample:

“That most famous Shakespearean scene, the balcony scene (Act 2, Scene 1), must have been an extraordinary surprise to the play’s first audience – not only because of its dramatic daring but because Juliet speaks again, and now with even richer eloquence. At first she seems to be talking only to herself – but we ‘overhear’ her (as Romeo does) actually arguing a complex philosophical case:

’Tis but thy name that is my enemy. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. … What’s in a name? That which we call a rose By any other word would smell as sweet. (2.1.80–81, 85–86)

Juliet displays the greater emotional realism in this famous scene of young love. Not for her Romeo’s reaching for poetical clichés, swearing by ‘yonder blessed moon’; rather, she says,

do not swear. Although I joy in thee, I have no joy in this contract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden … (2.1.158–60)”

MLA Citation:

Gay, Penny. “Juliet’s eloquence.” British Library, n.d., https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/juliets-eloquence. Accessed (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE).

In-Text: (Gay)

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APA Citation:

Gay, P. (n.d.). Juliet’s eloquence. British Library. Retrieved from https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/juliets-eloquence

In-Text: (Gay)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

http://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/new-mutiny-the-violence-of-romeo-and-juliet

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Sample:

“And while Romeo and Juliet has barely been off stage or screen since – it may well be Shakespeare’s most performed and adapted play – it takes on a particular intensity in places and periods where violence is more than a mere literary device. In communist Czechoslovakia in 1963, Czech director Otomar Krejča directed it at the Prague National Theatre in a famous version that, drawing heavily upon its Cold War context, made it into a parable of disaffected youth versus negligent age (seeing it in Paris the following year, Peter Brook declared this ‘the best production of the tragedy he had ever seen’). Indeed, according to some theatre historians Romeo and Juliet was one of the most popular plays behind the Iron Curtain; at Moscow’s Vakhtangov Theatre in 1956, Josef Rapoport offered an image of the lovers crushed by violent social forces, an approach echoed by Tamás Major’s Hungarian production of 1971, which played the feud as an outright civil war, put down by an overbearing military regime.”

MLA Citation:

Dickson, Andrew. “The violence of Romeo and Juliet.” British Library, n.d., http://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/new-mutiny-the-violence-of-romeo-and-juliet. Accessed (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE).

In-Text: (Dickson)

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APA Citation:

Dickson, A. (n.d.). The violence of Romeo and Juliet. British Library. Retrieved from http://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/new-mutiny-the-violence-of-romeo-and-juliet

In-Text: (Dickson)

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