Measuring Impact of Climate Change on Risk of Exinction for Various Species – sciencemag.org

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URL:

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/348/6234/571.full

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa4984

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Sample:

“Current predictions of extinction risks from climate change vary widely depending on the specific assumptions and geographic and taxonomic focus of each study. I synthesized published studies in order to estimate a global mean extinction rate and determine which factors contribute the greatest uncertainty to climate change–induced extinction risks. Results suggest that extinction risks will accelerate with future global temperatures, threatening up to one in six species under current policies. Extinction risks were highest in South America, Australia, and New Zealand, and risks did not vary by taxonomic group. Realistic assumptions about extinction debt and dispersal capacity substantially increased extinction risks. We urgently need to adopt strategies that limit further climate change if we are to avoid an acceleration of global extinctions.”

Description:

Article exploring how climate change and global warming may be increasing the chances of extinction, and accelerating the process for many species.

Author(s):

  • Mark C. Urban

Title:

  • Accelerating extinction risk from climate change

Publisher:

  • Journal: Science, Vol. 348, Issue 6234, pages 571-573

Date:

  • May 1, 2015

Citations:

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Most MLA citations on our site should follow this format:

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For citing an article in a scholarly journal you will use the journal title instead of publisher, and retain any volume, issue, and page numbers. Use a DOI in place of URL if one is available.

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