Hangovers and Alcohol Consumption Costs U.S. $200 Billion in 2006 – CDC.gov

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URL:

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html

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Sample:

“Excessive alcohol consumption, or heavy drinking, is defined as consuming an average of more than one alcoholic beverage per day for women, and an average of more than two alcoholic beverages per day for men, and any drinking by pregnant women or underage youth.

Researchers found the costs largely resulted from losses in workplace productivity (72 percent of the total cost), health care expenses for problems caused by excessive drinking (11 percent of the total cost), law enforcement and other criminal justice expenses related to excessive alcohol consumption (9 percent of the total cost), and motor vehicle crash costs from impaired driving (6 percent of the total cost). The study did not consider a number of other costs such as those due to pain and suffering by the excessive drinker or others who were affected by the drinking, and thus may be an underestimate. Researchers estimated that excessive drinking cost $746 per person in the United States in 2006.”

MLA Citation:

“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006.” cdc.gov. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Oct. 2011.  (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html>.

In-Text: (“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006”)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

APA Citation:

CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006. (2011, Oct. 17). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p1017_alcohol_consumption.html

In-Text: (“CDC reports excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. $224 billion in 2006”, 2011)

***REMEMBER all lines of the citation after the first get indented once***

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MLA 8

The 8th edition of MLA has resulted in changes to the citation format. Correcting the citations on our website will take some time. Until then, please reference the guidelines below to correct the citation format. You will still be using the information provided here, but you may need to adjust the format for MLA 8.

Most MLA citations on our site should follow this format:

Author, A. Title of Source. Publisher, Date, URL. Accessed, 1 Jan 2050.
"Web." removed
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No brackets around URLs
  • URLs should be placed after the publication date, separated by a comma, and before the date accessed, with a period at the end.

For citing an article in a scholarly journal you will use the journal title instead of publisher, and retain any volume, issue, and page numbers. Use a DOI in place of URL if one is available.

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