Early Spring Weather in 2017 the Result of Climate Change – The New York Times

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URL:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/08/climate/early-spring.html?_r=1

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Sample:

“By the 2017 calendar, the first day of spring is March 20. But spring leaves arrived in mid-January in some parts of the South, and spread northward like a wave. The map above plots the date of “first leaf,” a temperature-based calculation of when vegetation that has been dormant starts to show signs of life. This year, with the exception of a few small areas, the wave has arrived much earlier than the 30-year average.

An early spring means more than just earlier blooms of fruit trees and decorative shrubs like azaleas. It can wreak havoc on schedules that farmers follow for planting and that tourism officials follow for events that are tied to a natural activity like trees blooming. Some plant species that bud early may be susceptible to a snap frost later, and early growth of grasses and other vegetation can disrupt some animals’ usual cycles of spring feeding and growth.”

Description:

Article covering a report from scientists at World Weather Attribution that states the one likely cause for a warm Feb. in 2017 is climate change.

Author(s):

  • Jeremy White and Henry Fountain

Title:

  • Spring Came Early. Scientists Say Climate Change Is a Culprit.

Publisher:

  • The New York Times

Date:

  • March 8, 2017

Citations:

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