Detailed Biography of John Adams, Life and Presidency – Senate.gov

CREDIBLE SOURCE

URL:

https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/VP_John_Adams.htm

Can’t Find What You’re Looking For?

Tell us what you’re looking for in the Study Hall and get responses from us, and you’re fellow students. Get help with exactly what you need so you can get this assignment out of the way and move on to better things (or the next assignment).

Learn More

Sample:

“On April 21, 1789, John Adams, the first vice president of the United States, began his duties as president of the Senate. Adams’ role in the administration of George Washington was sharply constrained by the constitutional limits on the vice-presidency and his own reluctance to encroach upon executive prerogative. He enjoyed a cordial but distant relationship with President Washington, who sought his advice on occasion but relied primarily on the cabinet. Adams played a more active role in the Senate, however, particularly during his first term.

As president of the Senate, Adams cast twenty-nine tie-breaking votes—a record that no successor has ever threatened. His votes protected the president’s sole authority over the removal of appointees, influenced the location of the national capital, and prevented war with Great Britain. On at least one occasion he persuaded senators to vote against legislation that he opposed, and he frequently lectured the Senate on procedural and policy matters. Adams’ political views and his active role in the Senate made him a natural target for critics of the Washington administration. Toward the end of his first term, he began to exercise more restraint in the hope of realizing the goal shared by many of his successors: election in his own right as president of the United States.”

Description:

Author(s):

  • None.

Title:

  • John Adams, 1st Vice President (1789-1797)

Publisher:

  • United State Senate, Senate Historical Office

Date:

  • No date.

Citations:

Need the full citations? Request them in the Study Hall and we will respond with them as quickly as possible. You can also request more research, or get help with other parts of your paper.

Need More Help?

Chegg's tutors will help you get a better grade. Get your first 30 mins FREE.

MLA 8

The 8th edition of MLA has resulted in changes to the citation format. Correcting the citations on our website will take some time. Until then, please reference the guidelines below to correct the citation format. You will still be using the information provided here, but you may need to adjust the format for MLA 8.

Most MLA citations on our site should follow this format:

Author, A. Title of Source. Publisher, Date, URL. Accessed, 1 Jan 2050.
"Web." removed
  • Medium of publication does not need to be stated if obvious.
  • Listing the "name of the site" is not necessary if it is the same as the name of the publisher.
No brackets around URLs
  • URLs should be placed after the publication date, separated by a comma, and before the date accessed, with a period at the end.

For citing an article in a scholarly journal you will use the journal title instead of publisher, and retain any volume, issue, and page numbers. Use a DOI in place of URL if one is available.

Leave a Reply