CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons/RomJul/index.htm

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Sample:

“Drama is a literary composition involving conflict, action crisis and atmosphere designed to be acted by players on a stage before an audience. This definition may be applied to motion picture drama as well as to the traditional stage.

Apply these questions to a recent movie you have seen or a radio or television drama,

Conflict

What did the leading character want? What stood in his way? (People – environment- personality, etc,) What was the high point of tension or the crisis? (This is where the leading character must make a crucial decision that will effect the outcome of the play.)”

MLA Citation:

Burleson, Dr. Carolyn. “Drama”. drb.lifestreamcenter.com. Dr. Carolyn Burleson, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons/RomJul/index.htm>.

In-Text: (Burleson)

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APA Citation:

Burleson, Dr. C. (n.d.). Drama. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons/RomJul/index.htm

In-Text: (Burleson)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.shakespeare-literature.com/l_biography.html

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Sample:

“SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM (1564—1616), English poet, player and playwright, was baptized in the parish church of Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire on the 26th of April. Birth 1564. The exact date of his birth is not known. 18th-century antiquaries, William Oldys and Joseph Greene, gave it as April 23, but without quoting authority for their statements, and the fact that April 23 was the day of Shakespeare’s death in 1616 suggests a possible source of error. In any case his birthday cannot have been later than April 23, since the inscription upon his monument is evidence that on April 23, 1616, he had already begun his fifty-third year. His father, John Shakespeare, was a burgess of the recently constituted corporation of Stratford, and had already filled certain minor municipal offices. From 1561 to 1563 he had been one of the two chamberlains to whom the finance of the town was entrusted. By occupation he was a glover, but he also appears to have dealt from time to time in various kinds of agricultural produce, such as barley, timber and wool. Aubrey (Lives, 1680) spoke of him as a butcher, and it is quite possible that he bred and even killed the calves whose skins he manipulated. He is sometimes described in formal documents as a yeoman, and it is highly probable that he combined a certain amount of farming with the practice of his trade. He was living in Stratford as early as 1552, in which year he was fined for having a dunghill in Henley Street, but he does not appear to have been a native of the town, in whose records the name is not found before his time; and be may reasonably be identified with the John Shakespeare of Snitterfield, who administered the goods of his father, Richard Shakespeare, in 1561.”

MLA Citation:

“William Shakespeare Biography”. shakeseare-literature.com. Shakespeare-literature.com, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.shakespeare-literature.com/l_biography.html>.

In-Text: (“William Shakespeare Biography”)

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APA Citation:

William Shakespeare Biography. (n.d.). Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.shakespeare-literature.com/l_biography.html

In-Text: (William Shakespeare Biography)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.bardweb.net/man.html

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Sample:

“For all his fame and celebration, William Shakespeare remains a mysterious figure with regards to personal history. There are just two primary sources for information on the Bard: his works, and various legal and church documents that have survived from Elizabethan times. Naturally, there are many gaps in this body of information, which tells us little about Shakespeare the man.”

MLA Citation:

Pressley, J.M. “Shakespeare’s Biography”. barbweb.net. The Shakespeare Resource Center, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.bardweb.net/man.html>.

In-Text: (Pressley)

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APA Citation:

Pressley, J. (n.d.). Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.bardweb.net/man.html

In-Text: (Pressley)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/122

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Sample:

“William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564, in Stratford-on-Avon. The son of John Shakespeare and Mary Arden, he was probably educated at the King Edward IV Grammar School in Stratford, where he learned Latin and a little Greek and read the Roman dramatists. At eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway, a woman seven or eight years his senior. Together they raised two daughters: Susanna, who was born in 1583, and Judith (whose twin brother died in boyhood), born in 1585.”

MLA Citation:

“William Shakespeare”. poets.org. Academy of American Poets, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/122>.

In-Text: (“William Shakespeare”)

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APA Citation:

William Shakespeare. (n.d.). Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/122

In-Text: (William Shakespeare)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/nov/18/yossarian-slept-here-erica-heller-review?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

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Sample:

“Heller owed it all to one novel, published by Simon & Schuster on 10 October 1961; copies cost $5.95, in a print run of 7,500. Erica Heller, in her memoir of her father, calls it simply “the book”. Tracy Daugherty, in his biography (Just One Catch: The Passionate Life of Joseph Heller, Robson Press, £25), traces the trajectory towards its publication: how Catch-22 became catch-22. Erica is concerned more with the consequences: how Catch-22 became a catch-22.”

MLA Citation:

Sanson, Ian. “Yossarian Slept Here by Erica Heller — Review”. guardian.co.uk. The Guardian, 18 Nov. 2011. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/nov/18/yossarian-slept-here-erica-heller-review?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487>.

In-Text: (Sanson)

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APA Citation:

Sanson, I. (18 Nov 2011). Yossarian Slept Here by Erica Heller — Review. Retrieved (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE), from http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/nov/18/yossarian-slept-here-erica-heller-review?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

In-Text: (Sanson)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/oct/10/catch-22-50-years-joseph-heller

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Sample:

“The Catch-22 itself is a bureaucratic idiocy so sublime it leaves you staring out the window with wonder. As many of you will already know, the novel is set on a made-up island off the coast of Italy during the second world war, where an American bombing group is stationed. Desperate to impress his superiors, Colonel Cathcart keeps raising the number of missions his men have to fly. Our hero, Yossarian, has flown 50. Driven half-mad by his will to live, he wants out. But he’s thwarted by Catch-22, a clause which states that pilots don’t have to fly if they are certified as insane, but that being driven mad by fear is fundamentally rational. As it’s described in the novel: “Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn’t, but if he was sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn’t have to; but if he didn’t want to he was sane and had to.” The result, put simply, is that no one can get off the ride.”

MLA Citation:

Cox, Chris. “Catch-22: 50 Years Later”. guardian.co.uk. The Guardian, 10 Oct. 2011. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/oct/10/catch-22-50-years-joseph-heller>.

In-Text: (Cox)

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APA Citation:

Cox, Chris. (10 Oct, 2011). Catch-22: 50 Years Later. Retrieved (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE), fromhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/oct/10/catch-22-50-years-joseph-heller

In-Text: (Cox, 2011)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/09/04/joseph-heller-catch-22-50th-anniversary-how-the-novel-changed-america.html

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Sample:

“Most books disappear quickly down the memory hole. Even powerful literary works rarely outlast their generation. The world moves on and last year’s sensation can seem as dated as yesterday’s papers. For a book to survive half a century it must excite passion in individual readers and touch a nerve in the national psyche. Joseph Heller’s much-loved 1961 novel Catch-22 is just such a book, as unkillable as Yossarian, its stubbornly nay-saying anti-hero. The novel did not take off immediately, despite the publisher’s brilliantly conceived roll-out, but it broke through the following year as a mass-market paperback when young people could afford to buy it. Mixed reviews showed that its farcical deflation of a Mediterranean bombing campaign late in the “good war,” and especially its cartoonish technique, could make it a closed book to many older readers. But word-of-mouth and changing times soon made it a classic.”

MLA Citation:

Dickstein, Morris. “The Catch in ‘Cathc-22′”. thedailybeast.com. The Newsweek/Daily Beast Company LLC, 4 Sep. 2011. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/09/04/joseph-heller-catch-22-50th-anniversary-how-the-novel-changed-america.html>.

In-Text: (Dickstein)

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APA Citation:

Dickstein, M. (4 Sep, 2011). The Catch in “Catch-22″. Retrieved (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE), from http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/09/04/joseph-heller-catch-22-50th-anniversary-how-the-novel-changed-america.html

In-Text: (Dickstein, 2011)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/jan/30/rereading-stephen-king-christine

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Sample:

“Christine is the story of Arnold “Arnie” Cunningham (a name taken from two Happy Days characters), a shortsighted bookish type (a “loser”) who has only one friend and not much of a life. He’s an aching stereotype, but that’s not always a bad thing – as King had shown before – particularly when the stereotype breaks their mould and becomes the hero. So, we accept that he is somewhat nerdy; we accept that his one friend, Dennis, is one of the most hollow characters King has ever written, seemingly existing only to tell Arnie to be careful (and given that he’s the narrator of the book, that’s some going); and we accept that Arnie would see a battered, ruined 1958 Plymouth Fury on his way home from school and just buy it. No ifs or buts: he’s taken in, wanting to be cool, and he falls in love.”

MLA Citation:

Smythe, James. “Rereading Stephen King: week 15 – Christine”. guardian.co.uk. The Guardian, 30 Jan. 2013. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/jan/30/rereading-stephen-king-christine>.

In-Text: (Smythe)

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APA Citation:

Smythe, J. (30 Jan, 2013). Rereading Stephen King: week 15 – Christine. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/jan/30/rereading-stephen-king-christine

In-Text: (Smythe)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/22/rereading-stephen-king-the-shining

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Sample:

“The Shining is the story of Jack Torrance, who is employed as the caretaker of the gargantuan Overlook Hotel in Colorado one winter. Moving his wife, Wendy, and their son, Danny, into it for the season, he hopes to find peace: to finish his writing project, to escape his latent alcoholism, and to stich his fractured family unit together. But when they’re alone, Jack appears to go insane, pushed into fantasy – or hallucination. Eventually, he attacks his family, attempting to kill them in a twisted mirroring of the awful events that, it transpires, occurred in the hotel’s past. This is the story of both King’s 1977 novel and Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation three years later, but they’re vastly distinctive beasts. For the King fan, however, it’s hard to think of one without the other. The Shining is two stories, both the same, but somehow very different.”

MLA Citation:

Smythe, James. “Rereading Stephen King: week three – The Shining”. gaurdian.co.uk. The Gaurdian, 22 Jun. 2012. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/22/rereading-stephen-king-the-shining>.

In-Text: (Smythe)

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APA Citation: 

Smythe, J. (22 Jun, 2012). Rereading Stephen King: week three – The Shining. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/22/rereading-stephen-king-the-shining

In-Text: (Smythe)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/may/24/rereading-stephen-king-carrie

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Sample:

“Structurally it’s a really weird one, with a standard Kingian third-person narrative voice interspersed with extracts from other media: newspaper reports, autobiographies of characters, transcripts of police interviews, that sort of thing. It’s not a structure that entirely works, as the extracts are still slightly too close to King’s standard narrative voice, and are often the worst (read: slowest) parts of the novel. While still reeling from the excitement of some of the third-person sections – particularly the classic prom scene – being dragged somewhere else entirely and presented with an often less-interesting viewpoint isn’t always ideal. (In particular, there’s a series of extracts from Susan Snell’s fake biography; none are very interesting. Apart from anything else, they don’t read like biography: they read like monologues.)”

MLA Citation:

Smythe, James. “Rereading Stephen King: week one – Carrie”. gaurdian.co.uk. The Gaurdian, 24 May. 2012. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/may/24/rereading-stephen-king-carrie>.

In-Text: (Smythe)

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APA Citation:

Smythe, J. (24 May, 2012). Rereading Stephen King: week one – Carrie. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/may/24/rereading-stephen-king-carrie

In-Text: (Smythe)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://absoluteshakespeare.com/guides/hamlet/characters/characters.htm

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Sample:

“Claudius: The present King of Denmark, King Claudius took Queen Gertrude whom he loves as his queen and wife, much to the consternation of Hamlet who believes his mother has betrayed him and his father’s memory by doing so. Cautious and suspicious, Claudius has courtiers Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and Hamlet’s love interest Ophelia spying on Hamlet for him since as he says, the great ones must be watched. Distrustful of Hamlet and his “madness”, King Claudius has Hamlet deported to England to be killed when he fears he has become a threat.”

MLA Citation:

“Hamlet, Prince of Denmark Characters”. absoluteshakespeare.com. AbsoluteShakespeare.com, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://absoluteshakespeare.com/guides/hamlet/characters/characters.htm>.

In-Text: (“Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”)

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APA Citation:

Hamlet, Prince of Denamrk Characters. (n.d.). Absoluteshakespeare.com. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://absoluteshakespeare.com/guides/hamlet/characters/characters.htm

In-Text: (Absoluteshakespeare.com)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/9934731/They-could-be-savage-and-sensual.html

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Sample:

“Nor the documentary suggests were they quite the blushing virgins we imagine. When Charlotte and Emily stayed in Brussels to improve their French, the former fell passionately in love with her married tutor, Constantin Heger. Although unlikely that the love was consummated, the British Library holds parchment letters ripped up by Heger to avoid detection and carefully sewn back together by his nosy wife, in which Charlotte makes her ardour plain.”

MLA Citation:

Lockyer, Daphne. “‘They could be savage and sensual’”. telegraph.co.uk. Telegraph Media Group, 17 Mar. 2013. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/9934731/They-could-be-savage-and-sensual.html>.

In-Text: (Lockyer)

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APA Citation:

Lockyer, Daphne. (17 Mar, 2013). They could be savage and sensual. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/9934731/They-could-be-savage-and-sensual.html

In-Text: (Lockyer, 2013)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/bronte_sisters.shtml

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Sample:

“Charlotte was born on 21 April 1816, Emily on 30 July 1818 and Anne on 17 January 1820 all in Thornton, Yorkshire. They had two sisters, both of whom died in childhood and a brother, Branwell. Their father, Patrick, was an Anglican clergyman who was appointed as the rector of the village of Haworth, on the Yorkshire moors. After the death of their mother in 1821, their Aunt Elizabeth came to look after the family.”

MLA Citation:

“The Brontë Sisters (1818-1855)”. bbc.co.uk. BBC, 2013. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/bronte_sisters.shtml>.

In-Text: (“The Brontë Sisters (1818-1855)”)

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APA Citation:

The Brontë Sisters (1818-1855). 2013. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/bronte_sisters.shtml

In-Text: (The Brontë Sisters (1818-1855), 2013)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1027439,00.html

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Sample:

“There was another struggle in Miller, who died today at 89: between the polemicist’s need to blame society for its ills and the artist’s gift for discovering shadings, ambiguities, in the best or worst of men — for fleshing caricature into character. Blame runs through Miller’s two early Broadway hits, All My Sons (1947) and Death of a Salesman(1949) like toxic waste in a sylvan stream. Joe Keller, the munitions manufacturer in the first play, fudges the specs on airplane cylinders; to do otherwise would doom his company and, he thinks, his family. Because of his shortsightedness, other men’s sons die, and Joe pins the crime on his partner. Blame blame, shame shame. Willy Loman is not so black-and-white a figure — at least, not so black — but his compulsion to be accepted, along with his adulteries on the road and his inability to understand his sons, certainly set him up for the audience’s disapproval.”

MLA Citation:

Corliss, Richard. time.com. Time Inc., 11 Feb. 2005. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1027439,00.html>.

In-Text: (Corliss)

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APA Citation:

Corliss, R. (11 Feb, 2005). Death of The Salesman. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1027439,00.html

In-Text: (Corliss, 2005)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/speeches/quotations/famous-quotations-and-stories

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Sample:

“ ”Never Surrender”

“We shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing-grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills. We shall never surrender!”

—House of Commons, 4 June 1940, following the evacuation of British and French armies from Dunkirk as the German tide swept through France.”

MLA Citation:

“Famous Quotations and Stories”. winstonchurchill.org. The Churchill Centre and Museum at the Churchill War Rooms, 8 Oct. 2012. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/speeches/quotations/famous-quotations-and-stories>.

In-Text: (Famous Quotations and Stories)

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APA Citation:

Famous Quotations and Stories. (8 Oct, 2012). Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/speeches/quotations/famous-quotations-and-stories

In-Text: (Famous Quotations and Stories)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/biography/biography

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Sample:

“He won early fame as a war correspondent, covering the Cuban revolt against Spain (1895), and British campaigns in the Northwest Frontier of India (1897), the Sudan (1898) and South Africa during the Boer War (1899).”

MLA Citation:

Hayward, Steven. winstonchurchill.org. The Churchill Centre and Museum at the Churchill War Rooms, 12 May. 2011. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/biography/biography>.

In-Text: (Hayward)

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APA Citation:

Hayward, S. (12 May, 2011). Chart of Achievements. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.winstonchurchill.org/learn/biography/biography

In-Text: (Hayward, 2011)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1953/churchill-bio.html

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Sample:

“The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965), the son of Lord Randolph Churchill and an American mother, was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst. After a brief but eventful career in the army, he became a Conservative Member of Parliament in 1900. He held many high posts in Liberal and Conservative governments during the first three decades of the century. At the outbreak of the Second World War, he was appointed First Lord of the Admiralty – a post which he had earlier held from 1911 to 1915. In May, 1940, he became Prime Minister and Minister of Defence and remained in office until 1945. He took over the premiership again in the Conservative victory of 1951 and resigned in 1955. However, he remained a Member of Parliament until the general election of 1964, when he did not seek re-election. Queen Elizabeth II conferred on Churchill the dignity of Knighthood and invested him with the insignia of the Order of the Garter in 1953. Among the other countless honours and decorations he received, special mention should be made of the honorary citizenship of the United States which President Kennedy conferred on him in 1963.”

MLA Citation:

“The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953″. nobelprize.org. The Nobel Foundation, 1969. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1953/churchill-bio.html>.

In-Text: (The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953)

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APA Citation:

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953. (1969). Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1953/churchill-bio.html

In-Text: (The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://shakespearean.org.uk/ham1-haz.htm

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Sample:

“Hamlet is a name; his speeches and sayings but the idle coinage of the poet’s brain. What then, are they not real? They are as real as our own thoughts. Their reality is in the reader’s mind. It is we who are Hamlet. This play has a prophetic truth, which is above that of history. Whoever has become thoughtful and melancholy through his own mishaps or those of others; whoever has borne about with him the clouded brow of reflection, and thought himself “too much i’ th’ sun;” whoever has seen the golden lamp of day dimmed by envious mists rising in his own breast, and could find in the world before him only a dull blank with nothing left remarkable in it; whoever has known “the pangs of despised love, the insolence of office, or the spurns which patient merit of the unworthy takes;” he who has felt his mind sink within him, and sadness cling to his heart like a malady, who has had his hopes blighted and his youth staggered by the apparitions of strange things; who cannot well be at ease, while he sees evil hovering near him like a spectre; whose powers of action have been eaten up by thought, he to whom the universe seems infinite, and himself nothing; whose bitterness [75] of soul makes him careless of consequences, and who goes to a play as his best resource is to shove off, to a second remove, the evils of life by a mock representation of them – this is the true Hamlet.”

MLA Citation:

Hazlitt, William. “Characters of Shakespeare’s Plays”. shakespearean.org.uk. n.p., n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://shakespearean.org.uk/ham1-haz.htm>.

In-Text: (Hazlitt)

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APA Citation:

Hazlitt, William. (n.d.). Characters of Shakespear’s Plays. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://shakespearean.org.uk/ham1-haz.htm

In-Text: (Hazlitt, n.d.)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.bartleby.com/200/sw9.html

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Sample:

“We know that there was an older play by Thomas Kyd, that extraordinary dramatic (if not poetic) genius who was in all probability the author of two plays so dissimilar as the Spanish Tragedy and Arden of Feversham; and what this play was like we can guess from three clues: from the Spanish Tragedy itself, from the tale of Belleforest upon which Kyd’s Hamlet must have been based, and from a version acted in Germany in Shakespeare’s lifetime which bears strong evidence of having been adapted from the earlier, not from the later, play. From these three sources it is clear that in the earlier play the motive was a revenge-motive simply; that the action or delay is caused, as in the Spanish Tragedy, solely by the difficulty of assassinating a monarch surrounded by guards; and that the “madness” of Hamlet was feigned in order to escape suspicion, and successfully. In the final play of Shakespeare, on the other hand, there is a motive which is more important than that of revenge, and which explicitly “blunts” the latter; the delay in revenge is unexplained on grounds of necessity or expediency; and the effect of the “madness” is not to lull but to arouse the king’s suspicion. The alteration is not complete enough, however, to be convincing. Furthermore, there are verbal parallels so close to the Spanish Tragedy as to leave no doubt that in places Shakespeare was merely revising the text of Kyd. And finally there are unexplained scenes—the Polonius-Laertes and the Polonius-Reynaldo scenes—for which there is little excuse; these scenes are not in the verse style of Kyd, and not beyond doubt in the style of Shakespeare. These Mr. Robertson believes to be scenes in the original play of Kyd reworked by a third hand, perhaps Chapman, before Shakespeare touched the play. And he concludes, with very strong show of reason, that the original play of Kyd was, like certain other revenge plays, in two parts of five acts each. The upshot of Mr. Robertson’s examination is, we believe, irrefragable: that Shakespeare’s Hamlet, so far as it is Shakespeare’s, is a play dealing with the effect of a mother’s guilt upon her son, and that Shakespeare was unable to impose this motive successfully upon the “intractable” material of the old play.”

MLA Citation:

Eliot, T.S. Hamlet and His Problems (1921). bartleby.com. Bartleby.com, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.bartleby.com/200/sw9.html>.

In-Text: (Eliot)

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APA Citation:

Eliot, T.S. (1921). Hamlet and His Problems. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.bartleby.com/200/sw9.html

In-Text: (T.S. Eliot, 1921)

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URL:

-http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2010/07/the-booky-man-revisiting-to-kill-a-mockingbird-on.html

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Sample:

“After nearly 50 years in print, Mockingbird is surely the most widely read work of fiction about race relations ever printed. The book still sells a million copies a year, a staple of the syllabus of high schools and universities all over the world. Harper Lee still lives in the little town of Monroeville, in the Black Belt of Alabama, where she firmly turns down nearly every interview and PR opportunity, as she has since shortly after the book came out. Lee has friends, lots of them, and a social life. But the reporter’s notebook and the unblinking eye of the TV camera never suited her.”

MLA Citation:

McNair, Charles. pastemagazine.com. Paste Media Group, 15 Jul. 2010. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2010/07/the-booky-man-revisiting-to-kill-a-mockingbird-on.html>.

In-Text: (McNair)

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APA Citation:

McNair, C. (15 Jul, 2010). The Booky Man: Revisiting ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ on Its 50th Anniversary. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2010/07/the-booky-man-revisiting-to-kill-a-mockingbird-on.html

In-Text: (McNair, 2010)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://abcnews.go.com/WN/50th-anniversary-famous-harper-lee-book-kill-mockingbird/story?id=11126933#.UbOrqvmsiSo

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Sample:

“The novel, which won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize for fiction and became an Academy Award-winning film starring Gregory Peck, has never been out of print. In fact, one million copies are sold each year in 40 languages. The Library of Congress even has said that “Mockingbird” is second only to the Bible as books most often cited as making a difference.”

MLA Citation:

Noll, Eric, and Xorjie Olivares. abcnews.go.com. ABC News Network, 9 Jul. 2010. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://abcnews.go.com/WN/50th-anniversary-famous-harper-lee-book-kill-mockingbird/story?id=11126933#.UbOrqvmsiSo>.

In-Text: (Noll, Olivares)

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APA Citation:

Noll, Eric, and Xorjie Olivares. (9 Jul, 2010). Person of the Week: Celebrating 50 Years of Harper Lee’s Classic, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://abcnews.go.com/WN/50th-anniversary-famous-harper-lee-book-kill-mockingbird/story?id=11126933#.UbOrqvmsiSo

In-Text: (Noll and Olivares, 2010)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1960/08/to-kill-a-mockingbird-by-harper-lee/306456/

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Sample:

To Kill A Mockingbird is a more successful piece of work. It is frankly and completely impossible, being told in the first person by a six-year-old girl with the prose style of a well-educated adult. Miss Lee has, to be sure, made an attempt to confine the information in the text to what Scout would actually know, but it is no more than a casual gesture toward plausibility.”

MLA Citation:

Adams, Phoebe Lou. theatlantic.com. The Atlantic Monthly Group, 1 Aug. 1960. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1960/08/to-kill-a-mockingbird-by-harper-lee/306456/>.

In-Text: (Adams)

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APA Citation:

Adams, Phoebe Lou. (1 Aug, 1960). To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1960/08/to-kill-a-mockingbird-by-harper-lee/306456/

In-Text: (Adams, 1960)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

URL:

-http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/movies/2013/05/the-great-gatsby-a-voice-of-degeneration.html

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Samples:

“It would be fun not to know that Baz Luhrmann’s new movie is an adaptation, not to have read the book that it’s an adaptation of, not to bother comparing the movie to its source or evaluating its fidelity to or imaginative reinterpretation of the novel, but simply to watch “The Great Gatsby” as a movie that brings some notable actors together in a sumptuously-realized Jazz Age extravaganza to tell a tumble of good stories—of a lost love fleetingly recaptured, a couple of marriages unhinged, a crime unsolved, lives violently lost, a fledgling romance dissolved, the disillusionment of a New York newcomer, and, overall, of the end of a time of fabled exuberance—by way of vividly conceived characters and finely rhetorical dialogue. It wouldn’t make the resulting movie any better, but it would at least make for a source of wonder that an early-twenty-first-century screenwriter could offer up such a rich lode of material, regardless of the use made of it.”

“Fitzgerald’s literary and personal conception of the aphrodisiac power of money, though, was remote to two of the most important writers of the day—D. H. Lawrence, and Fitzgerald’s friend Ernest Hemingway, whose prime themes are virility and vitality, the physical energy and mental discipline which carry a sexual charge. In effect, they wrote of the higher animal prowling around the edges of a society and making incursions; Fitzgerald, however, wrote of society, remained an insider, and his view of social gamesmanship and the finely-calibrated inflections and higher frequencies with which insiders speak to each other—and the forceful desires that those glittering games both conceal and express—is the essence of his poetic vision of the world, the charm of his despair.”

MLA Citation:

Brody, Richard. newyorker.com. Conde Naste, 10 May. 2013. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/movies/2013/05/the-great-gatsby-a-voice-of-degeneration.html>.

In-Text: (Brody)

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APA Citation:

Brody, R. (10 May, 2013). ”‘The Great Gatsby’: Try Again, Old Sport”. Retrieved (DATE OF ACCESS), from http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/movies/2013/05/the-great-gatsby-a-voice-of-degeneration.html

In-Text: (Brody, 2013)

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CREDIBLE SOURCE:

 

Description:

Biography of well-recognized US poet Rita Dove with many links to more info.

URL:

http://people.virginia.edu/~rfd4b/

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Sample:

“Rita Dove served as Poet Laureate of the United States and Consultant to the Library of Congress from 1993 to 1995 and as Poet Laureate of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2004 to 2006.”

MLA Citation:

“A Brief Biography.” The Rita Dove HomePage. University of Virginia, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://people.virginia.edu/~rfd4b/>.

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Description:

Detailed biography of multifaceted Spanish artist Salvador Dali with timeline.

URL:

https://web.duke.edu/lit132/dalibio.html

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Sample:

“Apart from painting, Dalí’s output included sculpture, book illustration, jewellery design, and work for the theatre. In collaboration with the director Luis Buñuel he also made the first Surrealist films—Un chien andalou (1929) and L’Age d’or (1930)—and he contributed a dream sequence to Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound (1945). He also wrote a novel, Hidden Faces (1944) and several volumes of flamboyant autobiography. Although he is undoubtedly one of the most famous artists of the 20th century, his status is controversial; many critics consider that he did little if anything of consequence after his classic Surrealist works of the 1930s. There are museums devoted to Dalí’s work in Figueras, his home town in Spain, and in St Petersburg in Florida.”

MLA Citation:

“Salvador Dali Biography.” duke.edu. Duke University, n.d. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <https://web.duke.edu/lit132/dalibio.html>.

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Description:

Interview with Norman Mailer where he exposes many details of his life/career.

URL:

http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/mai0int-1

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Sample:

“Norman Mailer: Yes. I studied it for the first couple of years and realized I didn’t want to be an engineer and I wasn’t going to be a good one. But I stayed on and got my degree in engineering. Parenthetically, Harvard didn’t even give a degree in engineering. It was a Bachelor of Sciences. But I got my degree by taking the minimum of courses necessary. I took art history and advanced writing courses and stuff like that. I had a very easy time in college for which I’m paying now, because I didn’t study economics and history when I was in college. I now have to plow through such books with great difficulty.”

MLA Citation:

“Norman Mailer Interview.” Academy of Achievement. Academy of Achievement, 12 June. 2004. Web. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/mai0int-1

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Description:

Biography of writer Joyce Carol Oates including details about her life and work.

URL:

http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/oat0bio-1

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Sample:

“When she transferred to the high school in Lockport, she quickly distinguished herself. An excellent student, she contributed to her high school newspaper and won a scholarship to attend Syracuse University, where she majored in English. When she was only 19, she won the “college short story” contest sponsored by Mademoiselle magazine.”

MLA Citation:

“Joyce Carol Oates.” Academy of Achievement. American Academy of Achievement. (PUT DATE OF ACCESS HERE). <http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/oat0bio-1>.

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Description:

This is a biography about famous poet Anne Sexton containing detailed information about all areas of her life, writing, and career. Includes bibliography and links to obituaries.

URL:

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/anne-sexton

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Sample:

“Transformations, a retelling of Grimm’s fairy tales, marked a shift away from the confessional manner of her earlier work, which several commentators found to be a fruitful change.”

 

MLA Citation: